6/15/07

Mirage and Oasis: energy choices in an age of global warming



1.British New Economic Foundation http://www.neweconomics.org
has just released a very useful 60 page report:

Mirage and Oasis: energy choices in an age of global warming
(on Nukes, Renewables and Climate change)

(on line as PDF and downloadable)
http://www.neweconomics.org/gen/uploads/sewyo355prhbgunpscr51d2w29062005080838.pdf

The Government's endorsement of expanding nuclear power is the definition of irrational policy. Like a stool with no legs, it fails on economic, energy and environmental grounds", said nef policy director, Andrew Simms, responding to the government's energy white paper at the the end of May. nef's research has shown that the costs of nuclear have been potentially underestimated by nearly a factor of three. And, "Perversely, expanding, or even just replacing existing nuclear capacity could actually hasten global warming. The government's own Performance and Innovation Unit warned that going down the nuclear path could set back better, smaller-scale alternatives which could turn every home and business into a climate-friendly power station. Nuclear also has a dirty little secret. According to the industry's own figures, even at current rates of use, reserves of proven high-grade uranium ore will not last out this century. Faster use means it will be exhausted even quicker" added Simms.

2.New Economics foundation http://www.neweconomics.org

e-letter (you can subscribe)

nef e-letter:

Energy white paper: nuclear endorsement fails on economics, energy and environment, says nef
Planning white paper: well-being and the environment sacrificed on planning altar

Energy white paper: nuclear endorsement fails on economics, energy and environment, says nef
Chttp://www.neweconomics.org

Mirage and Oasis: energy choices in an age of global warming

Planning white paper: well-being and the environment sacrificed on planning altar

The Government's endorsement of expanding nuclear power is the definition of irrational policy. Like a stool with no legs, it fails on economic, energy and environmental grounds", said nef policy director, Andrew Simms, responding to the government's energy white paper at the the end of May. nef's research has shown that the costs of nuclear have been potentially underestimated by nearly a factor of three. And, "Perversely, expanding, or even just replacing existing nuclear capacity could actually hasten global warming. The government's own Performance and Innovation Unit warned that going down the nuclear path could set back better, smaller-scale alternatives which could turn every home and business into a climate-friendly power station. Nuclear also has a dirty little secret. According to the industry's own figures, even at current rates of use, reserves of proven high-grade uranium ore will not last out this century. Faster use means it will be exhausted even quicker" added Simms.

"The Government wants to bypass proper public debate and trade off our environment in the name of speed and competitiveness. But their idea of competitiveness is completely one-dimensional: ignoring vital aspects of development and change that determine our long-term well-being as individuals and as a society as whole. Ultimately, the government is saying that our well-being and quality of life don't matter. We should not sacrifice the nation's well-being and environment on the altar of planning for short-term economic gain", said Henry Oliver, nef''s head of regeneration and localism responding to government proposals for the planning system.

3. . From International Herald Trobune:

Britain sets out plans to secure energy and fight warming
ReutersPublished: May 23, 2007

LONDON: Britain on Wednesday set out plans to secure energy supplies and fight global warming, calling for new nuclear power plants, more renewable energy and greater efficiency.

The nuclear call was met with cheers from utility companies but jeers from environmentalists, although some welcomed the emphasis on renewable energy.

Britain's oil and gas reserves from the North Sea are dwindling, the country does not want to rely too heavily on Russian suppliers, and Britain also wants to meet its carbon emission cut targets.

"If nuclear is excluded, there is every chance that its place would be taken by gas and coal generation, which of course emits carbon," the trade and industry secretary, Alistair Darling, said in Parliament, making public the Energy White Paper.

"I am quite clear in my mind that it is important that we have a mix of energy supply," he said. "That we don't become overly dependent on imported gas."

The white paper issued Wednesday follows repeated energy policy reviews over the last few years and concern is mounting that Britain will face a power shortage unless decisive action is taken soon.

"Time is against us if we are to avoid power shortages," said Richard Lambert, director general of the Confederation of British Industry. "The white paper suggests the government understands what is needed to avoid this energy crunch."

"The real test now will be in delivering these proposals," he said.

As well as securing supplies, Darling said the new measures would save up to 33 million tons of carbon by 2020 - equivalent to the emissions from every road vehicle in the country.

The government wants to triple electricity from renewable sources, increase energy efficiency and change lifestyles to cut rising electricity demand and carbon emissions.

The European Union aims to get 20 percent of its energy from renewable sources by 2020, and a draft law going through the British Parliament calls for the country to cut emissions of climate-warming carbon dioxide by 60 percent by 2050.

Prime Minister Tony Blair insists Britain needs a new generation of nuclear power plants to replace the 20 percent of electric power the old facilities provide.

But because a judge criticized the government this year for failing to consult the public adequately on the nuclear issue, Darling was also on Wednesday forced to begin a 20-week full consultation process.

"The government's endorsement of expanding nuclear power is the definition of irrational policy," said Andrew Simms of the New Economics Foundation. "Like a stool with no legs, it fails on economic, energy and environmental grounds."

The environmental group Greenpeace, which filed the legal challenge, accused the government of tinkering with a failing energy efficiency and renewable-energy policy "while indulging its nuclear obsession".

It said it would not hesitate to go back to court if the government did not consult fairly.

---- clamshellalliance@yahoogroups.com wrote:

=============

--
Roy Morrison & Associates, LLC
Eco Power Hedge, LLC


www.RMAenergy.net
www.EcoPowerHedge.com